About

Rusty as Elvis copyBorn to immigrant parents, R.H. (Rusty) Foerger and his five other siblings were raised by a widow since he was 15 months old after his father died in a car crash in rural Alberta. Fatherlessness and poverty set the conditions for struggle and the spiritual journey. Decorated and award winning retired Fire Officer R.H. (Rusty) Foerger is married to Mercy, a beautiful East Indian woman whom he met at University over 30 years ago. Together they serve as marriage mentors and teachers in their local church, where they have raised their now three adult children. He and his family live within walking distance to their church in the community where he has coached soccer and hockey, helped build the local playground, and supported various other community building projects. This includes working for social justice, and restorative justice. Rusty has been been a lay pastor, teacher, missionary and mentor for over 30 years. He has recently retired after 33 years as a senior officer from the fire service, where, for most of his career, Rusty worked with families with children who set fires. In the last quarter of his career, he focussed on mentoring junior officers. Throughout his bi-vocational ministry, he has worked to live an integrated spiritual life, and continues to teach against the stream of disintegration. Rusty is a lifelong and life-wide learner who has taught in India, Colombia, Peru, Dominican Republic and many churches in Canada. You can follow his writing on his blog called “More Enigma than Dogma” and a prayer blog he curates titled, “Curriculum of the Spiritual Life.”

9 thoughts on “About”

  1. Thanks for stopping in at my blog. I like what you are doing here…keep it up!

    Liked by 1 person

  2. Thank you for recently visiting my blog site. It is great to meet other Christians on Word Press. Happy New Year, and God bless.

    Liked by 1 person

  3. LOve…Love…your site

    Liked by 1 person

    • Thanks for the encouragement. I appreciate your dedication to finding the silver linings in life – and then sharing with others. You are prolific, and you have managed to gather a happy following. I hope to make contributions that invite and enfold in joyous mystery of the One who made us for Himself. Peace to you.

      Liked by 1 person

  4. Hi, Rusty —

    My daughter (now nearly 18) thinks she might be trans. She came to this conclusion after imbibing a lot of social media. She’s always liked “boy stuff” and frankly I’ve always thought she was going to be gay, but the trans thing is now the narrative a lot of kids are latching onto in order to explain to themselves why they can’t “do” their biological sex in the rigid way society is telling them is mandatory. Needless to say, spouse and I are horrified at the degree of risk that transition entails, both physical and psychological. And we are doubly horrified at how quickly this narrative has taken over the med/psych/pharma world, so that it is now illegal in some states for psychs to even explore the roots of these feelings with minors, for fear of being accused of offering “conversion therapy.”

    I believe, as you do, that humans are made for the pleasure of our Creator, the manifestation of the Creator’s endless creativity. My child has been exposed to such ideas from the time she came into our family as a toddler.

    Many people will reject outright any spiritual diagnosis/remedy for the out-of-sync gender feelings that are so rampant now, yet I believe that spiritual illness is precisely where the problem lies.

    I appreciate your thoughtful blogs and …. I ask you to join me in prayer for my child, that she will find her true identity as a child of the One who made us all, and will come to appreciate her body as a good gift rather than a “wrong” thing to be reshaped and (to some degree) jettisoned.

    Wishing you peace.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Hi Jeri, first of all: thanks for honouring me with your comments, and for enlisting me in prayer for your child. As you have been reading in my blogs, I advocate a compassionate response while maintaining that our identity is best found, and redemptive-ly discovered in Christ. Not only will you have to relate to your daughter as an adult, but you will also have to walk this journey of identity confusion. I agree that this is a profound spiritual moment. May you and your spouse find both, your wisdom and comfort in Christ – for the thing your daughter will most remember is how you walked with her in this time. You might find this interesting as you contemplate your response of committed love for your daughter: https://moreenigma.wordpress.com/2015/08/17/are-we-all-q-duringin-an-age-of-discovery/
      Shalom.

      Liked by 1 person

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